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Monday
Sep252017

Rest Assured

A man who is sort of a mentor to me told me I needed to learn to rest, to let go. “You can’t receive with a hand that’s full,” he said. It was hard at first to understand what I was holding on to. Thinker that I am, I spent quite a bit of time thinking about it. The problem with thinkers is they tend to, well, overthink, which then tends toward a lack of peace, the very opposite of rest.

Needless to say, I got rest issues.

Teaching from his You’ve Already Got It! series on the Gospel Truth, Andrew speaks about rest:

“It’s not a matter of getting God to do something; it’s a matter of resting in what He’s already done. . . . The Sabbath was a picture of this rest that we have in the Lord. . . . When God commanded the Old Testament Sabbath—that man take a rest on the seventh day—it was [a] picture that everything was really from God. God had already provided.” (brackets added)

In other words, when I’m in a position of rest, it’s because I understand that God’s got this. It’s because I’m trusting in the Lord.

In Matthew 6:25-26, Jesus said it another way:

“Therefore I say to you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink; nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food and the body more than clothing? [26] Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?”

New King James Version

I can see how what Jesus said here applies to many areas of the Christian life. Take finances, for example. I’ve not heard many preachers go to the above passage in Matthew when they talk about sowing and reaping. They usually reference only 2 Corinthians 9:6-10 and put the emphasis on sowing in order to reap. The problem with that is, when this passage in 2 Corinthians is not taught in balance with the one in Matthew, people tend to trust in their sowing rather than trust in God. Where’s the rest in that? When I’m focused on what I must do, there isn’t any room for rest.

I’m learning that a better way to prosper is to put the emphasis on trusting God, which is all about the heart.

During the same broadcast, Andrew shares this about the Sabbath rest:

“When God first gave the Jews this command about the Sabbath, did you know that there was nobody on the face of the planet that took one day out of seven off? Man, they were working seven out of seven days, fifteen-hour days, laboring and bringing forth fruit by the sweat of their brow. And yet here come God’s people, and they take one out of seven days off. . . . They would have had less. But actually, it was just the opposite. Because they were trusting in God and relying upon Him and following His command, the Jews prospered more with just six days of labor than all of the other nations did with seven days of labor.”

That’s awesome! Andrew goes on to say that the Sabbath “was a picture to them that God was their source, and all of their effort was just a response to God. It was a cooperation with God.”

My excessive thinking was getting in the way of cooperating with God. And I was only getting what I could come up with on my own, which wasn’t very much. But when I co-labor with the Lord, putting the emphasis on trust in Him and His plan, I cease from fretting. I rest assured, “for we who have believed do enter that rest” (Heb. 4:3, NKJV ).

Have you entered into that rest? Share your story with us in the comments below. Also, don’t forget to watch Andrew’s You’ve Already Got It! teaching, airing all this month on the Gospel Truth, or watch missed episodes online or on Roku.

Written by David Moore II

For resources and products in the U.S., visit www.awmi.net; outside the U.S., visit www.awme.net.

Reader Comments (5)

it realy difficult especialy when i have been praying for a job and havn't got any since.it realy hard please you people should join me in prayer too.

September 25, 2017 | Unregistered Commenterrakia

The Lord spoke to me several years ago, "Don't ask me for a job." I realized that leads to thinking that He may or may not provide. He then said, "Ask me: 'Where do You want me to work in Your vineyard?'" This prayer is much better, because it assumes (correctly!) that He does have a place of provision - it's not a "yes" or "no" issue, but "I know you have work for me - where is it?" I think that's an example of how God has us enter His rest. It's a deep trust in the face of apparent lack. It's being confident when it looks like nothing is going to happen. This is the time to be confident in God! When the Egyptian army is marching toward you and you are walled in by wilderness - it's time to lift your head and rejoice, because God is about to do something awesome in your life!

September 25, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterBenjamin

Glory to God! I have entered into rest because I trust in God.

September 26, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterEmmanuel

Resting should be the easiest "exercise" of all, but I find it's the hardest at times. I agree that rest is basically trust. If I'm truly trusting, I will be at rest. When I find myself getting anxious, I have to stop and ask what area I'm not trusting God with. Whether it's finances, protection, or a healing I'm believing for, anxiety about it is a sign I need to stop looking at what seems true in the natural, and start thanking God that Jesus has already provided everything I need in my born-again spirit. My only "work" is to praise Him for His provision, get into a quiet place and listen for His voice. Amazing how quickly being thankful and remembering all He has already done creates a place of rest.

September 29, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterJean

Rest Assured!

September 29, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterDina

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